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Archives for : January2012

Imprint Apparel, branding in style

Branded Wearables

Choosing company t-shirts, embroidered baseball caps, and other great promotional items has never been easier. There are many different companies that can help you choose the perfect design, and material for the baseball caps. Using this type of promotional item can increase the brand awareness of your business.  Everyone loves free gifts, and baseball caps are particularly liked due to their versatility.

Although you want the company t-shirts, embroidered baseball caps, and other items to be affordable you should try, and ensure that they are not too cheap. They are great to be given away at promotional events, or to say thank you to loyal customers. This style of promotional gift will ensure that, your company name and logo is seen everywhere.

In Canada alone baseball caps are worn 5.8 times per month far more than any other country.  They are seen by a huge number of people every time they are worn. Shirts have a fantastic potential at reaching contacts with over 113 in the US, and in Canada the potential is even higher at 140. Company t-shirts, embroidered baseball caps, and other customized apparel are ideal as they will be worn by every member of staff, friend, and family member.

People Love Promotional Products

People Love Promotional Products

Watch this video and find out more…

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Effectiveness Of Promotional Products As An Advertising Medium, a study conducted by PPAI Research and fielded through Market Tools, Inc. Copyright 2009. All rights reserved.

Case Study of the Month

Case Study of the month

Blippy Finds Fun in Nail Clippers 


The leadership team at Blippy, a social media site where users post and follow each other’s notes about what they are buying, was looking for a fun and slightly off-kilter promotion to get people to sign up for the service. Sort of a Twitter for shopping, the site lets users help each other find good deals, so it made sense to draw people to the site with a fun freebie.Rather than a pen, mug or luggage tag, the Blippy team decided on a more unusual, but still practical giveaway: a branded nail clipper. Users could get the metal clipper, which was emblazoned with the Blippy logo and the Web acronym “omgwtf,” by creating a Blippy account and sending in their mailing address. The three-month campaign dripped with snarky humor, from cofounder Philip Kaplan’s Tweet – “I’m not kidding. You think I’m kidding but I’m not.” – that included a link to the promotion’s website (www.freenailclippers.com) to the promise on the site that, “We will mail you actual nailclippers. In the mail. For your manky talons.”“We started the promotion kind of as a joke, but it’s become much bigger than we expected,” says Kaplan, who has founded several other Internet companies over the years, including AdBrite and PK Interactive. “It’s fun and a relatively inexpensive way to please our users.”Though when asked who the clipper giveaway was targeting, Kaplan dryly says, “people with fingernails,” the tone and methods for getting the word out – through Tweets and blog posts – targeted the message to the Web-savvy people most likely to embrace Blippy.

The company, which launched at the beginning of 2010, has gotten much of its growth from public relations and word of mouth, so the free clipper fit in with Blippy’s viral strategy. The giveaway got a number of hits on tech and business news sites, and it was all the company could do to keep enough clippers on hand to fill orders.

Though Kaplan can’t put a specific number on additional users Blippy has acquired through the promotion, he jokes, “The nail clipper company probably thinks we’re crazy because we keep reordering these 500-count boxes.”

This case study was published on Succesful Promotions
Barbara Peisajovich, MBA – Alto Marketing – www.altomarketing.ca

For reprint information contact Barbara Peisajovich, at Barbara@altomarketing.ca writing reprint in subject line.

Case Study of the Month

Case Study of the month

Blippy Finds Fun in Nail Clippers 


The leadership team at Blippy, a social media site where users post and follow each other’s notes about what they are buying, was looking for a fun and slightly off-kilter promotion to get people to sign up for the service. Sort of a Twitter for shopping, the site lets users help each other find good deals, so it made sense to draw people to the site with a fun freebie.Rather than a pen, mug or luggage tag, the Blippy team decided on a more unusual, but still practical giveaway: a branded nail clipper. Users could get the metal clipper, which was emblazoned with the Blippy logo and the Web acronym “omgwtf,” by creating a Blippy account and sending in their mailing address. The three-month campaign dripped with snarky humor, from cofounder Philip Kaplan’s Tweet – “I’m not kidding. You think I’m kidding but I’m not.” – that included a link to the promotion’s website (www.freenailclippers.com) to the promise on the site that, “We will mail you actual nailclippers. In the mail. For your manky talons.”“We started the promotion kind of as a joke, but it’s become much bigger than we expected,” says Kaplan, who has founded several other Internet companies over the years, including AdBrite and PK Interactive. “It’s fun and a relatively inexpensive way to please our users.”Though when asked who the clipper giveaway was targeting, Kaplan dryly says, “people with fingernails,” the tone and methods for getting the word out – through Tweets and blog posts – targeted the message to the Web-savvy people most likely to embrace Blippy.

The company, which launched at the beginning of 2010, has gotten much of its growth from public relations and word of mouth, so the free clipper fit in with Blippy’s viral strategy. The giveaway got a number of hits on tech and business news sites, and it was all the company could do to keep enough clippers on hand to fill orders.

Though Kaplan can’t put a specific number on additional users Blippy has acquired through the promotion, he jokes, “The nail clipper company probably thinks we’re crazy because we keep reordering these 500-count boxes.”

This case study was published on Succesful Promotions
Barbara Peisajovich, MBA – Alto Marketing – www.altomarketing.ca

For reprint information contact Barbara Peisajovich, at Barbara@altomarketing.ca writing reprint in subject line.